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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 960826, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/960826
Review Article

Bifidobacteria-Host Interactions—An Update on Colonisation Factors

Institute of Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Ulm, 89068 Ulm, Germany

Received 7 July 2014; Revised 20 August 2014; Accepted 20 August 2014; Published 11 September 2014

Academic Editor: Clara G. de los Reyes-Gavilán

Copyright © 2014 Verena Grimm et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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