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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 962915, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/962915
Review Article

Commentary on the Regulation of Viral Proteins in Autophagy Process

1Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
2Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
3Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan

Received 14 December 2013; Accepted 4 February 2014; Published 10 March 2014

Academic Editor: Wei-Li Hsu

Copyright © 2014 Ching-Yuan Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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