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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 964010, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/964010
Review Article

Stem Cell Transplantation for Muscular Dystrophy: The Challenge of Immune Response

1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6DE, UK
2Experimental Hematology Unit, Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132 Milan, Italy
3Institute of Immunology, Department of Biology, National University of Ireland Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland

Received 14 February 2014; Accepted 5 June 2014; Published 26 June 2014

Academic Editor: Fabio Rossi

Copyright © 2014 Sara Martina Maffioletti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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