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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 964964, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/964964
Review Article

Regulation of CDK9 Activity by Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation

1Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Department of Medicine, Howard University, 520 W Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20059, USA
2Division of Molecular and Radiation Biophysics, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188350, Russia
3Department of Biophysics, St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Polytechnicheskaya Street 29, St. Petersburg 195251, Russia

Received 20 October 2013; Accepted 11 December 2013; Published 12 January 2014

Academic Editor: Sheng-Hao Chao

Copyright © 2014 Sergei Nekhai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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