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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 104209, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/104209
Review Article

Next-Generation Technologies for Multiomics Approaches Including Interactome Sequencing

1Division of Interactome Medical Sciences, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639, Japan
2Division of Molecular Biology, Tokyo University of Science Research Institute for Biomedical Science, 2669 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-0022, Japan

Received 27 June 2014; Revised 30 August 2014; Accepted 31 August 2014

Academic Editor: Calvin Yu-Chian Chen

Copyright © 2015 Hiroyuki Ohashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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