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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 127596, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/127596
Research Article

Relationship between Hyperuricemia and Lipid Profiles in US Adults

1Division of Family Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital and School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, No. 325, Section 2, Chenggong Road, Neihu District, Taipei City 114, Taiwan
2Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital and School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, No. 325, Section 2, Chenggong Road, Neihu District,Taipei City 114, Taiwan
3Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, No. 161, Section 6, Minquan E. Road, Neihu District, Taipei City 114, Taiwan
4Department of Occupational Safety and Hygiene, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Received 13 May 2014; Revised 22 September 2014; Accepted 22 September 2014

Academic Editor: Abel Romero-Corral

Copyright © 2015 Tao-Chun Peng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Although the link between hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome had been recognized, the association of the dyslipidemia among individuals with hyperuricemia remains not comprehensively assessed. Methods. Using NHANES III study, we examined the relation between serum lipid profiles and different serum uric acid levels, including serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein-B, lipoprotein (a), apolipoprotein AI, ratio of triglycerides to HDL cholesterol, and ratio of apolipoprotein-B to AI. Results. After adjusting for potential confounders, average differences (95% confidence interval) comparing the top to the bottom (reference) serum uric acid were 0.29 (0.19, 0.39) mmol/L for total cholesterol, 0.33 (0.26, 0.41) mmol/L for triglycerides, 0.14 (0.01, 0.27) mmol/L for LDL cholesterol, −0.08 (−0.11, −0.05) mmol/L for HDL, and 0.09 (0.05, 0.12) g/L for serum apolipoprotein-B. Notably, ratios of triglycerides to HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein-B to AI were also linearly associated with uric acid levels (P for trend < 0.001). Conclusions. This study suggested that serum LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein-B levels, ratio of triglycerides to HDL cholesterol, and ratio of apolipoprotein-B to AI are strongly associated with serum uric acid levels, whereas serum HDL cholesterol levels are significantly inversely associated. In the clinical practice, the more comprehensive strategic management to deal with dyslipidemia and hyperuricemia deserves further investigation.