Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 127596, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/127596
Research Article

Relationship between Hyperuricemia and Lipid Profiles in US Adults

1Division of Family Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital and School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, No. 325, Section 2, Chenggong Road, Neihu District, Taipei City 114, Taiwan
2Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital and School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, No. 325, Section 2, Chenggong Road, Neihu District,Taipei City 114, Taiwan
3Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, No. 161, Section 6, Minquan E. Road, Neihu District, Taipei City 114, Taiwan
4Department of Occupational Safety and Hygiene, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Received 13 May 2014; Revised 22 September 2014; Accepted 22 September 2014

Academic Editor: Abel Romero-Corral

Copyright © 2015 Tao-Chun Peng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. S. Lehto, L. Niskanen, T. Rönnemaa, and M. Laakso, “Serum uric acid is a strong predictor of stroke in patients with non- insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus,” Stroke, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 635–639, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. C. Bickel, H. J. Rupprecht, S. Blankenberg et al., “Serum uric acid as an independent predictor of mortality in patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease,” The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 89, no. 1, pp. 12–17, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. K. Choi and E. S. Ford, “Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in individuals with hyperuricemia,” The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 120, no. 5, pp. 442–447, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  4. B. F. Culleton, M. G. Larson, W. B. Kannel, and D. Levy, “Serum uric acid and risk for cardiovascular disease and death: the Framingham heart study,” Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 131, no. 1, pp. 7–13, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. “Plan and operation of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–94. Series 1: programs and collection procedures,” Vital and Health Statistics, no. 32, pp. 1–407, 1994.
  6. M. Bethesda, The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III 1988-94) Reference Manuals and Reports, National Center for Health Statistics, 1996.
  7. M. Hyattsville, Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994: NHANES III Household Adult Data File, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1996.
  8. F. B. Hu, E. Rimm, S. A. Smith-Warner et al., “Reproducibility and validity of dietary patterns assessed with a food- frequency questionnaire,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 69, no. 2, pp. 243–249, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. D. Feskanich, E. B. Rimm, E. L. Giovannucci et al., “Reproducibility and validity of food intake measurements from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire,” Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 93, no. 7, pp. 790–796, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. D. Sarmah and B. Sharma, “A correlative study of uric acid with lipid profile,” Asian Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 8–14, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  11. W. Lu, K. Song, Y. Wang et al., “Relationship between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome: an analysis by structural equation modeling,” Journal of Clinical Lipidology, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 159–167, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  12. D. Conen, V. Wietlisbach, P. Bovet et al., “Prevalence of hyperuricemia and relation of serum uric acid with cardiovascular risk factors in a developing country,” BMC Public Health, vol. 4, article 1, 9 pages, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  13. M. H. Davidson, C. M. Ballantyne, T. A. Jacobson et al., “Clinical utility of inflammatory markers and advanced lipoprotein testing: advice from an expert panel of lipid specialists,” Journal of Clinical Lipidology, vol. 5, no. 5, pp. 338–367, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  14. G. Walldius, I. Jungner, I. Holme, A. H. Aastveit, W. Kolar, and E. Steiner, “High apolipoprotein B, low apolipoprotein A-I, and improvement in the prediction of fatal myocardial infarction (AMORIS study): a prospective study,” The Lancet, vol. 358, no. 9298, pp. 2026–2033, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  15. M. J. McQueen, S. Hawken, X. Wang et al., “Lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins as risk markers of myocardial infarction in 52 countries (the INTERHEART study): a case-control study,” The Lancet, vol. 372, no. 9634, pp. 224–233, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  16. O.-N. Goek, A. Köttgen, R. C. Hoogeveen, C. M. Ballantyne, J. Coresh, and B. C. Astor, “Association of apolipoprotein A1 and B with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in two multiethnic population samples,” Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, vol. 27, no. 7, pp. 2839–2847, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  17. F. Facchini, Y.-D. I. Chen, C. B. Hollenbeck, and G. M. Reaven, “Relationship between resistance to insulin-mediated glucose uptake, urinary uric acid clearance, and plasma uric acid concentration,” Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 266, no. 21, pp. 3008–3011, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. W. Baldwin, S. McRae, G. Marek et al., “Hyperuricemia as a mediator of the proinflammatory endocrine imbalance in the adipose tissue in a murine model of the metabolic syndrome,” Diabetes, vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 1258–1269, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  19. P. Sartipy and D. J. Loskutoff, “Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in obesity and insulin resistance,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 100, no. 12, pp. 7265–7270, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  20. B. J. Goldstein and R. Scalia, “Adiponectin: a novel adipokine linking adipocytes and vascular function,” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 89, no. 6, pp. 2563–2568, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  21. T. Keenan, M. J. Blaha, K. Nasir et al., “Relation of uric acid to serum levels of high-sensitivity c-reactive protein, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and to hepatic steatosis,” The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 110, no. 12, pp. 1787–1792, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  22. T. Nakagawa, H. Hu, S. Zharikov et al., “A causal role for uric acid in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome,” The American Journal of Physiology: Renal Physiology, vol. 290, no. 3, pp. F625–F631, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  23. L. G. Sanchez-Lozada, E. Tapia, P. Bautista-García et al., “Effects of febuxostat on metabolic and renal alterations in rats with fructose-induced metabolic syndrome,” The American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology, vol. 294, no. 4, pp. F710–F718, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  24. J. Vekic, Z. Jelic-Ivanovic, V. Spasojevic-Kalimanovska et al., “High serum uric acid and low-grade inflammation are associated with smaller LDL and HDL particles,” Atherosclerosis, vol. 203, no. 1, pp. 236–242, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  25. J. T. Moriarity, A. R. Folsom, C. Iribarren, F. J. Nieto, and W. D. Rosamond, “Serum uric acid and risk of coronary heart disease: atherosclerosis risk in communities (ARIC) study,” Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 136–143, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. G. A. A. Ferns, J. Lanham, P. Dieppe, and D. J. Galton, “A DNA polymorphism of an apoprotein gene associates with the hypertriglyceridaemia of primary gout,” Human Genetics, vol. 78, no. 1, pp. 55–59, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. Y. Moriwaki, T. Yamamoto, S. Takahashi, Z. Tsutsumi, and K. Higashino, “Apolipoprotein E phenotypes in patients with gout: relation with hypertriglyceridaemia,” Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, vol. 54, no. 5, pp. 351–354, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. H. Vuorinen-Markkola and H. Yki-Järvinen, “Hyperuricemia and insulin resistance,” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 78, no. 1, pp. 25–29, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. N. J. Stone, J. Robinson, A. H. Lichtenstein et al., “2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in adults: a report of the American college of cardiology/American heart association task force on practice guidelines,” Circulation, vol. 129, pp. S1–S45, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  30. Y. Zhu, B. J. Pandya, and H. K. Choi, “Prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia in the US general population: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2008,” Arthritis and Rheumatism, vol. 63, no. 10, pp. 3136–3141, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus