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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 134027, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/134027
Review Article

Correlation of CCNA1 Promoter Methylation with Malignant Tumors: A Meta-Analysis Introduction

1Department of Thoracic Surgery, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130033, China
2Department of Geriatrics, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130033, China

Received 19 July 2014; Revised 23 October 2014; Accepted 7 November 2014

Academic Editor: Sabine Rohrmann

Copyright © 2015 Bin Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes by promoter methylation plays vital roles in the process of carcinogenesis. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine whether the aberrant methylation of cyclin A1 (CCNA1) may be of great significance to human malignant tumors. By searching both English and Chinese language-based electronic databases carefully, we tabulated and analyzed parameters from each study. All human-associated case-control studies were included providing available data for CCNA1 methylation and reporting the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) conducted with the use of Version 12.0 STATA software. A total of 10 case-control studies (619 patients with cancers and 292 healthy controls) were included for the following statistical analysis. Pooled OR values from all articles revealed that the frequency of CCNA1 methylation in cancer tissues was significantly higher than those of normal tissues . Further ethnicity indicated that the frequency of CCNA1 methylation was correlated with the development of malignant tumors among all those included experimental subgroups (all ). These data from results indicated a significant connection of CCNA1 methylation with poor progression in human malignant tumors among both Caucasian and Asian populations.