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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 137020, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/137020
Review Article

Use of Pharmacotherapies in the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders and Opioid Dependence in Primary Care

1Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD 20857, USA
2Division of Pharmacologic Therapies, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, USA

Received 23 May 2014; Revised 22 August 2014; Accepted 10 September 2014

Academic Editor: Harry Hao-Xiang Wang

Copyright © 2015 Jinhee Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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