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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 148343, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/148343
Research Article

Genetic Variability of Candida albicans Sap8 Propeptide in Isolates from Different Types of Infection

Biology Department, Minho University, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal

Received 10 November 2014; Accepted 12 January 2015

Academic Editor: György Schneider

Copyright © 2015 Joana Carvalho-Pereira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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