Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 149785, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/149785
Clinical Study

Chlorhexidine Gluconate Dressings Reduce Bacterial Colonization Rates in Epidural and Peripheral Regional Catheters

1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg, Germany
2Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Philipps University Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse 2, 35043 Marburg, Germany
3Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospital Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg, Germany

Received 30 January 2015; Accepted 10 March 2015

Academic Editor: Annette Rebel

Copyright © 2015 Klaus Kerwat et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. J. R. Hebl and A. D. Niesen, “Infectious complications of regional anesthesia,” Current Opinion in Anesthesiology, vol. 24, pp. 573–580, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. T. Volk, L. Engelhardt, C. Spies et al., “Incidence of infection from catheter procedures for regional anesthesia: first results from the network of DGAI and BDA,” Anaesthesist, vol. 58, no. 11, pp. 1107–1112, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. A. M. Morin, K. M. Kerwat, M. Klotz et al., “Risk factors for bacterial catheter colonization in regional anaesthesia,” BMC Anesthesiology, vol. 5, article 1, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. K. Hanazaki, K. Shingu, W. Adachi, T. Miyazaki, and J. Amano, “Chlorhexidine dressing for reduction in microbial colonization of the skin with central venous catheters: a prospective randomized controlled trial,” Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 165–168, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. S. T. Chambers, J. Sanders, W. N. Patton et al., “Reduction of exit-site infections of tunnelled intravascular catheters among neutropenic patients by sustained-release chlorhexidine dressings: results from a prospective randomized controlled trial,” Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 53–61, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. H. Ruschulte, M. Franke, P. Gastmeier et al., “Prevention of central venous catheter related infections with chlorhexidine gluconate impregnated wound dressings: a randomized controlled trial,” Annals of Hematology, vol. 88, pp. 267–272, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Infectious Complications Associated with Neuraxial Techniques, “Practice advisory for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques: a report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques,” Anesthesiology, vol. 112, pp. 530–545, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. A. M. Morin, K. M. Kerwat, J. Büttner et al., “Hygiene recommendations for the initiation and continued care of regional anaesthetic procedures—the 15 ‘Musts’ of the Scientific Working Group Regional Anaesthesia,” Anasthesiologie und Intensivmedizin, vol. 47, no. 6, pp. 372–379, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. F. Reisig, M. Neuburger, Y. A. Zausig, B. M. Graf, and J. Büttner, “Successful infection control in regional anesthesia procedures,” Anaesthesist, vol. 62, no. 2, pp. 105–112, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. D. G. Maki, C. E. Weise, and H. W. Sarafin, “A semiquantitative culture method for identifying intravenous catheter related infection,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 296, no. 23, pp. 1305–1309, 1977. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. K. Kerwat, S. Schulz-Stübner, T. Steinfeldt et al., “Hygiene recommendations for regional anesthesia—an updated recommendation,” Anästhesiologie, Intensivmedizin, Notfallmedizin und Schmerztherapie, vol. 56, pp. 34–40, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  12. M. Neuburger, F. Reisig, L. Zimmermann, and J. Büttner, “Infection control in continuous peripheral regional anesthesia: clinical study on disinfection time and subcutaneous tunneling in interscalene plexus anesthesia,” Anaesthesist, vol. 58, no. 8, pp. 795–799, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. M. Neuburger, J. Büttner, S. Blumenthal, J. Breitbarth, and A. Borgeat, “Inflammation and infection complications of 2285 perineural catheters: a prospective study,” Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 108–114, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. X. Capdevila, S. Bringuier, and A. Borgeat, “Infectious risk of continuous peripheral nerve blocks,” Anesthesiology, vol. 110, no. 1, pp. 182–188, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. V. Compère, J. F. Legrand, P. G. Guitard et al., “Bacterial colonization after tunneling in 402 perineural catheters: a prospective study,” Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 108, no. 4, pp. 1326–1330, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. S. Kost-Byerly, J. R. Tobin, R. S. Greenberg, C. Billett, M. Zahurak, and M. Yaster, “Bacterial colonization and infection rate of continuous epidural catheters in children,” Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 86, no. 4, pp. 712–716, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. X. Capdevila, P. Pirat, S. Bringuier et al., “Continuous peripheral nerve blocks in hospital wards after orthopedic surgery: a multicenter prospective analysis of the quality of postoperative analgesia and complications in 1,416 patients,” Anesthesiology, vol. 103, no. 5, pp. 1035–1045, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. Scott, J. Stones, and N. Payne, “Antiseptic solutions for central neuraxial blockade: which concentration of chlorhexidine in alcohol should we use?” British Journal of Anaesthesia, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. 456–457, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. R. Checketts, “Wash & go—but with what? skin antiseptic solutions for central neuraxial block,” Anaesthesia, vol. 67, no. 8, pp. 819–822, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus