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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 178407, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/178407
Review Article

Animal Models in Studying Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation

1Department of Anesthesiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040, China
2Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040, China

Received 6 August 2015; Revised 11 October 2015; Accepted 25 October 2015

Academic Editor: Aaron S. Dumont

Copyright © 2015 Ming Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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