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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 182389, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/182389
Research Article

Evaluation and Application of the Strand-Specific Protocol for Next-Generation Sequencing

1Department of Medical Education and Research, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
2YourGene Biotechnology, Taipei, Taiwan
3Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan
4Department of Parasitology, National Cheng Kung University Medical College, Tainan, Taiwan
5Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
6Bioinformatics Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
7Genomics and Proteomics Core Laboratory, Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

Received 11 September 2014; Accepted 3 February 2015

Academic Editor: Dongchun Liang

Copyright © 2015 Kuo-Wang Tsai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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