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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 183074, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/183074
Research Article

Gender Differences in Cerebral Regional Homogeneity of Adult Healthy Volunteers: A Resting-State fMRI Study

1Medical Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Anhui 230031, China
2Laboratory of Digital Medical Imaging, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Anhui 230031, China
3Institute of Computer Application of Chinese Medicine, Anhui Academy of Chinese Medicine, Anhui 230038, China
4Graduate School, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Anhui 230038, China
5Department of Electronic Science and Technology, University of Science & Technology of China, Anhui 230027, China
6Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
7School of Acupuncture & Osteology, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Anhui 230038, China
8Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Anhui 230031, China
9CAS Key Laboratory of Brain Function & Disease and School of Life Sciences, University of Science & Technology of China, Anhui 230027, China
10Center of Medical Physics and Technology, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, CAS, Anhui 230031, China

Received 14 May 2014; Revised 7 September 2014; Accepted 30 September 2014

Academic Editor: Hengyi Rao

Copyright © 2015 Chunsheng Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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