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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 184574, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/184574
Review Article

T Helper Subsets, Peripheral Plasticity, and the Acute Phase Protein, α1-Antitrypsin

Department of Clinical Biochemistry & Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, 84101 Be’er Sheva, Israel

Received 3 April 2015; Accepted 30 May 2015

Academic Editor: Sylvain Audia

Copyright © 2015 Boris M. Baranovski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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