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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 193715, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/193715
Research Article

Childhood Lead Exposure from Battery Recycling in Vietnam

1Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Box 357234, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2National Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health, 57 Le Quy Don, Hai Ba Trung, Hanoi, Vietnam
3School of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 356340, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
4Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, 300 George Street, Suite 901, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
5Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Karonga Prevention Study, P.O. Box 46, Chilumba, Karonga District, Malawi
6Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences and Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Box 354695, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
7Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Box 354695, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
8Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 359739, Seattle, WA 98195, USA

Received 3 June 2015; Revised 18 September 2015; Accepted 29 September 2015

Academic Editor: Teresa Coccini

Copyright © 2015 William E. Daniell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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