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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 195828, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/195828
Research Article

Construction of a CXCL12-KDEL Fusion Gene to Inhibit Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastasis by Intracellular Sequestration of CXCR4

Department of Maxillofacial and ENT, National Cancer Clinical Research Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute & Hospital, Tianjin 300060, China

Received 26 June 2014; Revised 18 August 2014; Accepted 19 August 2014

Academic Editor: Shiwu Zhang

Copyright © 2015 Wenchao Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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