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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 202914, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/202914
Research Article

Epigenomics of Neural Cells: REST-Induced Down- and Upregulation of Gene Expression in a Two-Clone PC12 Cell Model

1Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Center for Translational Genomics and Bioinformatics, 20132 Milan, Italy
2CNR Institute of Neuroscience, 20129 Milan, Italy
3Humanitas Research Center, Rozzano, 20089 Milan, Italy
4Boehringer Ingelheim, 88400 Biberach an der Riß, Germany
5Division of Neurosciences, San Raffaele Institute and Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, 20133 Milan, Italy

Received 16 March 2015; Accepted 16 July 2015

Academic Editor: Salvatore Spicuglia

Copyright © 2015 Jose M. Garcia-Manteiga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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