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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 204628, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/204628
Research Article

Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis and a Large-Sample Study

1Department of Radiology, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Functional Imaging, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, No. 154 Anshan Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300052, China
2Tianjin Anning Hospital, Tianjin 300300, China

Received 2 August 2014; Revised 5 October 2014; Accepted 26 October 2014

Academic Editor: Yu-Feng Zang

Copyright © 2015 Yongjie Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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