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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 215267, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/215267
Research Article

Verbal Aggression from Care Recipients as a Risk Factor among Nursing Staff: A Study on Burnout in the JD-R Model Perspective

1Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università degli Studi di Torino, Via Verdi 8, 10124 Torino, Italy
2Dipartimento di Scienze Sociali e Politiche, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via del Conservatorio 7, 20122 Milano, Italy
3Dipartimento di Economia, Management e Metodi Quantitativi, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Conservatorio 7, 20122 Milano, Italy

Received 9 February 2015; Revised 7 April 2015; Accepted 4 May 2015

Academic Editor: Stavroula Leka

Copyright © 2015 Sara Viotti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Among nursing staff, the risk of experiencing violence, especially verbal aggression, is particularly relevant. The present study, developed in the theoretical framework of the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R), has two main aims: (a) to examine the association between verbal aggression and job burnout in both nurses and nurse’s aides and (b) to assess whether job content, social resources, and organizational resources lessen the negative impact of verbal aggression on burnout in the two professional groups. The cross-sectional study uses a dataset that consists of 630 workers (522 nurses and 108 nurse’s aides) employed in emergency and medical units. High associations were found between verbal aggression and job burnout in both professional groups. Moderated hierarchical regressions showed that, among nurses, only the job content level resources moderated the effects of the verbal aggression on job burnout. Among nurse’s aides, the opposite was found. Some resources on the social and organizational levels but none of the job content level resources buffered the effects of verbal aggression on workers burnout. The study highlights the crucial role of different types of resources in protecting nursing staff from the detrimental effects of verbal aggression on job burnout.