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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 219012, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/219012
Review Article

Hereditary Syndromes Manifesting as Endometrial Carcinoma: How Can Pathological Features Aid Risk Assessment?

1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore 229899
2Cancer Genetics Service, National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore 169610
3Oncology Academic Clinical Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore 169857
4Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore, 11 Hospital Drive, Singapore 169610

Received 4 October 2014; Accepted 23 November 2014

Academic Editor: Ignacio Zapardiel

Copyright © 2015 Adele Wong and Joanne Ngeow. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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