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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 235195, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/235195
Review Article

Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in Spinal Cord Injury: A Review and Update

Department of Surgery, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong

Received 12 March 2015; Revised 19 June 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Markus Kipp

Copyright © 2015 Ning Li and Gilberto K. K. Leung. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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