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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 239362, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/239362
Review Article

Benchtop Technologies for Circulating Tumor Cells Separation Based on Biophysical Properties

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 26 December 2014; Revised 26 February 2015; Accepted 26 February 2015

Academic Editor: Jianyu Y. Rao

Copyright © 2015 Wan Shi Low and Wan Abu Bakar Wan Abas. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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