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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 246870, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/246870
Research Article

CD8+ T-Cells Count in Acute Myocardial Infarction in HIV Disease in a Predominantly Male Cohort

1Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, UPMC Montefiore Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
3Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
4University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05446, USA
5Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55415, USA
6VA Medical Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30033, USA
7Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
8VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA 15240, USA
9Hamad Medical Corporation, P.O. Box 3050, Doha, Qatar
10Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
11Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
12Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
13Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA
14Department of General Internal Medicine and Public Health, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
15Department of Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA
16Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
17Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Infectious Diseases Section, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
18VA North Texas Healthcare System, Dallas, TX 75216, USA
19Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
20Washington DC VA Medical Center, Washington, DC 20422, USA
21George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20037, USA
22Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
23Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
24Veteran Affairs Connecticut Health Care System, West Haven Veterans Administration Medical Center, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06516, USA
25Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2525 West End, Suite 300-A, Nashville, TN 37203, USA

Received 23 June 2014; Accepted 7 October 2014

Academic Editor: Qaisar Mahmood

Copyright © 2015 Oluwatosin A. Badejo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Human Immunodeficiency Virus- (HIV-) infected persons have a higher risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than HIV-uninfected persons. Earlier studies suggest that HIV viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and antiretroviral therapy are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Whether CD8+ T-cell count is associated with CVD risk is not clear. We investigated the association between CD8+ T-cell count and incident AMI in a cohort of 73,398 people (of which 97.3% were men) enrolled in the U.S. Veterans Aging Cohort Study-Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC). Compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with high baseline CD8+ T-cell counts (>1065 cells/mm3) had increased AMI risk (adjusted , 95% CI: 1.46 to 2.28). There was evidence that the effect of CD8+ T-cell tertiles on AMI risk differed by CD4+ T-cell level: compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with CD4+ T-cell counts ≥200 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with high CD8+ T-cell count, while those with CD4+ T-cell counts <200 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with low CD8+ T-cell count. CD8+ T-cell counts may add additional AMI risk stratification information beyond that provided by CD4+ T-cell counts alone.