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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 247382, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/247382
Review Article

In Vivo Anti-Candida Activity of Phenolic Extracts and Compounds: Future Perspectives Focusing on Effective Clinical Interventions

1Mountain Research Centre (CIMO), ESA, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia 1172, 5301-855 Bragança, Portugal
2Centre of Biological Engineering (CEB), Laboratório de Investigação em Biofilmes Rosário Oliveira (LIBRO), University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal

Received 2 April 2015; Revised 30 July 2015; Accepted 6 August 2015

Academic Editor: Peter Fu

Copyright © 2015 Natália Martins et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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