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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 257983, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/257983
Research Article

Investigation of Ser315 Substitutions within katG Gene in Isoniazid-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from South India

Division of Biomedical Informatics, Department of Clinical Research, National Institute for Research in Tuberculosis (NIRT), Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), No. 1 Mayor Sathyamoorthy Road, Chetput, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600 031, India

Received 2 July 2014; Accepted 20 October 2014

Academic Editor: Filippo Canducci

Copyright © 2015 A. Nusrath Unissa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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