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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 259843, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/259843
Research Article

Osteoprotegerin and TRAIL in Acute Onset of Atrial Fibrillation

Chair of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Ulica Śniadeckich 10, 31-531 Kraków, Poland

Received 14 April 2015; Revised 14 June 2015; Accepted 22 June 2015

Academic Editor: Tatjana Potpara

Copyright © 2015 Krzysztof Rewiuk and Tomasz Grodzicki. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. There is a growing amount of evidence that inflammatory processes are involved in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) and its complications. We decided to investigate the behavior of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) in terms of acute onset of AF. Methods and Results. We included 60 patients with acute onset of AF, candidates for pharmacological cardioversion. The presence of cardiovascular comorbidities was connected with higher concentration of OPG and lower level of TRAIL right from the first hours of AF paroxysm. The initial TRAIL level correlated also positively with left ventricle ejection fraction and negatively with left atrium diameter. We found subsequent increase of OPG in subgroups selected on the basis of CHA2DS2-VASc scoring. Although basal concentrations of studied markers did not allow prediction of the restoration of sinus rhythm, we observed important increase of TRAIL concentration in subgroup with sinus rhythm maintenance (94.11 ± 29.46 versus 111.39 ± 30.23 pg/mL; ). Conclusions. OPG and TRAIL are associated with the underlying cardiovascular damage in AF, but their balance is modulated by the fact of sinus rhythm restoration. Determining the suitability of OPG and TRAIL as predictive markers in AF requires further prospective studies.