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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 265278, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/265278
Research Article

Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Is Dislocated in Type I Fibers of Myalgic Muscle but Can Recover with Physical Exercise Training

1Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense C, Denmark
2Institute of Clinical Research, Pathology and SDU Muscle Research Cluster, University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense M, Denmark
3National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

Received 15 December 2014; Revised 24 January 2015; Accepted 18 February 2015

Academic Editor: Leonardo F. Ferreira

Copyright © 2015 L. Jensen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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