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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 269150, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/269150
Research Article

Genepleio Software for Effective Estimation of Gene Pleiotropy from Protein Sequences

1College of Mathematics & Information Science, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, China
2State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and MOE Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
3College of Life & Environmental Science, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035, China
4Shanghai Stem Cell Institute, Institutes of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
5Department of Genetics, Developmental and Cell Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA

Received 3 June 2014; Revised 15 July 2014; Accepted 26 July 2014

Academic Editor: Siyuan Zheng

Copyright © 2015 Wenhai Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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