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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 285869, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/285869
Review Article

Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

1Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, SA 5095, Australia
2School of Engineering, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, SA 5095, Australia

Received 19 September 2014; Accepted 20 March 2015

Academic Editor: Dong-sheng Shen

Copyright © 2015 Giles T. S. Kirby et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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