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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 289152, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/289152
Research Article

Characterization and Evaluation of a Commercial WLAN System for Human Provocation Studies

1Department of Experimental Neurobiology, University of Pécs, 6 Ifjúság Útca, Pécs 7624, Hungary
2Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto di Elettronica e di Ingegneria dell’Informazione e delle Telecomunicazioni (IEIIT), Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano, Italy
3Szentagothai Research Center, University of Pécs, Ifjúság Útca 20, Pècs 7624, Hungary
4National Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Anna Útca 5, Budapest 1221, Hungary

Received 12 September 2014; Accepted 27 May 2015

Academic Editor: Peter P. Egeghy

Copyright © 2015 Norbert Zentai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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