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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 293271, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/293271
Review Article

Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases

Institute of Embryo-Fetal Original Adult Disease, The International Peace Maternity & Child Health Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200030, China

Received 10 September 2015; Accepted 12 November 2015

Academic Editor: Louiza Belkacemi

Copyright © 2015 Fan Wu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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