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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 293512, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/293512
Research Article

Decreased Splenic T-Lymphocytes in Apolipoprotein M Gene Deficient Mice

1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou 213003, China
2Comprehensive Laboratory, Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou 213003, China
3Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, 221 85 Lund, Sweden

Received 16 July 2015; Revised 23 September 2015; Accepted 28 September 2015

Academic Editor: Fabrizio Montecucco

Copyright © 2015 Zhigang Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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