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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 316829, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/316829
Research Article

Association between AKT1 Gene Polymorphism rs2498794 and Smoking-Related Traits with reference to Cancer Susceptibility

1Addictive Substance Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506, Japan
2Department of Clinical Nursing, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192, Japan
3Department of Tumor Pathology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192, Japan
4Department of Pathology, Iwata City Hospital, Iwata 438-8550, Japan
5Department of Pathology, Saitama Medical Center, Jichi Medical University, Saitama 330-8503, Japan

Received 3 March 2015; Revised 14 May 2015; Accepted 21 May 2015

Academic Editor: Diego Forero

Copyright © 2015 Daisuke Nishizawa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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