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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 324014, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/324014
Research Article

Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Can Enhance Angiogenic Capacity via MMPs In Vitro and In Vivo

1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Nanjing Medical University, No. 140, Han Zhong Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, China
2Department of Dental Implant, Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, No. 140, Han Zhong Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, China
3Department of Stomatology, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, No. 32, Renmingnan Road, Shiyan, Hubei 442000, China

Received 5 October 2014; Revised 18 December 2014; Accepted 22 December 2014

Academic Editor: Kazuhisa Bessho

Copyright © 2015 Fei Jiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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