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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 324702, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/324702
Research Article

Developmental Changes in Morphology of the Middle and Posterior External Cranial Base in Modern Homo sapiens

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ 85308, USA
2Department of Anatomy, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ 85308, USA
3School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University, USA

Received 27 February 2015; Revised 19 May 2015; Accepted 24 May 2015

Academic Editor: P. J. Oefner

Copyright © 2015 Deepal H. Dalal and Heather F. Smith. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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