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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 327963, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/327963
Review Article

Positive mRNA Translational Control in Germ Cells by Initiation Factor Selectivity

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA

Received 18 May 2015; Accepted 22 July 2015

Academic Editor: Nikolai V. Ravin

Copyright © 2015 Andrew J. Friday and Brett D. Keiper. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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