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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 341723, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/341723
Review Article

Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

1Department of Oncology, Haematology and Respiratory Diseases, University Hospital of Modena, 41124 Modena, Italy
2Department of Obstetrics Gynecology and Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit, University Hospital of Modena, 41124 Modena, Italy
3Department of Medical Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA

Received 2 January 2015; Revised 27 April 2015; Accepted 29 April 2015

Academic Editor: Stefan Rimbach

Copyright © 2015 Angela Toss et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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