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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 349584, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/349584
Review Article

Is the Experience of Thermal Pain Genetics Dependent?

Department of Anesthesia, Center of Head and Orthopedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, No. 4231, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

Received 4 August 2014; Revised 10 November 2014; Accepted 10 November 2014

Academic Editor: Chi-Un Pae

Copyright © 2015 Emilia Horjales-Araujo and Joergen B. Dahl. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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