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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 349806, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/349806
Clinical Study

Is Infusion of Subhypnotic Propofol as Effective as Dexamethasone in Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting Related to Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy? A Randomized Controlled Trial

1Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Palandoken, 25140 Erzurum, Turkey
2Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Erzurum Education Hospital, Palandoken, 25070 Erzurum, Turkey
3Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Sakarya Education Hospita, Korucuk Mah., 54290 Adapazari, Turkey

Received 3 July 2014; Accepted 6 November 2014

Academic Editor: Yukio Hayashi

Copyright © 2015 Mine Celik et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of common complications in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of subhypnotic (1 mg/kg/h) infusion of propofol with dexamethasone on PONV in patients undergoing LC. Methods. A total of 120 patients were included in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to 3 groups; patients of group dexamethasone (group D) were administrated 8 mg dexamethasone before induction of anesthesia, patients of group propofol (group P) were infused to subhypnotic (1 mg/kg/h) propofol during operation and patients of group control (group C) were applied infusion of 10% intralipid. The incidence of PONV and needs for rescue analgesic and antiemetic were recorded in the first 24 h postoperatively. Results. In the 0–24 h, the incidence of PONV was significantly lower in the group D and group P compared with the group C (37.5%, 40%, and 72.5%, resp.). There was no significant difference in the incidence of PONV and use of antiemetics and analgesic between group D and group P. Conclusion. We concluded that infusion of propofol 1 mg/kg/h is as effective as dexamethasone for the prevention of PONV during the first 24 hours after anesthesia in patients undergoing LC.