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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 394183, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/394183
Review Article

Cardiovascular Reflexes Activity and Their Interaction during Exercise

1Department of Medical Sciences, Sports Physiology Lab, University of Cagliari, Via Porcell 4, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama 350-8585, Japan

Received 9 May 2015; Revised 26 July 2015; Accepted 28 July 2015

Academic Editor: Kimimasa Tobita

Copyright © 2015 Antonio Crisafulli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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