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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 398045, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/398045
Research Article

The Absence of N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine Causes Attenuation of Virulence of Candida albicans upon Interaction with Vaginal Epithelial Cells In Vitro

1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
2MTA-SZTE Dermatological Research Group, Hungary
3Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary
4Institute of Biochemistry, Biological Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary
5Creative Laboratory Ltd., Szeged, Hungary

Received 19 May 2015; Revised 15 June 2015; Accepted 28 July 2015

Academic Editor: Stanley Brul

Copyright © 2015 Máté Manczinger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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