Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 401357, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/401357
Research Article

Different Plaque Composition and Progression in Patients with Stable and Unstable Coronary Syndromes Evaluated by Cardiac CT

1Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Palle Juul-Jensens Boulevard 99, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
2Cardiac Imaging Center, Hospital Unit Vest, Gl. Landevej 61, 7400 Herning, Denmark
3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Aarhus University Hospital, Palle Juul-Jensens Boulevard 99, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
4Department of Radiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Palle Juul-Jensens Boulevard 99, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark

Received 17 April 2015; Accepted 7 July 2015

Academic Editor: Sara Seitun

Copyright © 2015 Maiken Glud Dalager et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To compare the quantity, subtype, and progression of atherosclerosis by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with stable (SAP) and unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (UAP/n-STEMI). Methods. Forty patients with SAP and 20 with UAP/n-STEMI underwent cardiac CT and angiography with IVUS at baseline and after one year. Atherosclerotic segments were divided into calcified, mixed, or noncalcified subtypes, and significant stenoses were registered. Results. Thirty-two SAP and 15 UAP/n-STEMI patients completed the CT follow-up. At baseline, the number of atherosclerotic segments was higher in UAP/n-STEMI than in SAP (). UAP/n-STEMI patients had more segments with noncalcified plaques () whereas SAP patients had more segments with calcified plaques (). The number of segments with significant stenosis did not differ between the groups, but noncalcified plaques more frequently caused significant stenoses in UAP/n-STEMI than in SAP patients (). After one year the number of segments with atherosclerosis increased in SAP patients (). The number of atherosclerotic segments remained unchanged in UAP/n-STEMI patients. However, composition was altered as the number of segments with noncalcified plaques decreased (). IVUS data confirmed the CT findings. Conclusion. Quantity, subtype, and progression of atherosclerosis differ between SAP and UAP/n-STEMI patients.