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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 404201, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/404201
Research Article

Different Short-Term Mild Exercise Modalities Lead to Differential Effects on Body Composition in Healthy Prepubertal Male Rats

1The Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
2Gravida: National Centre for Growth and Development, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
3Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
4Department of Sports and Exercise Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand

Received 16 September 2014; Accepted 8 December 2014

Academic Editor: Peter Krustrup

Copyright © 2015 D. M. Sontam et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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