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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 406261, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/406261
Review Article

Neurophysiological Effects of Meditation Based on Evoked and Event Related Potential Recordings

Patanjali Research Foundation, Patanjali Yogpeeth, Haridwar, Uttarakhand 249405, India

Received 28 November 2014; Revised 28 January 2015; Accepted 8 February 2015

Academic Editor: Carlo Miniussi

Copyright © 2015 Nilkamal Singh and Shirley Telles. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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