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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 418159, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/418159
Research Article

Evaluation of the Effect of Hypercapnia on Vascular Function in Normal Tension Glaucoma

1UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland
2Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion, Edinburgh, UK

Received 22 May 2015; Accepted 26 July 2015

Academic Editor: Paolo Fogagnolo

Copyright © 2015 B. Quill et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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