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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 431725, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/431725
Research Article

Burnout Is Associated with Reduced Parasympathetic Activity and Reduced HPA Axis Responsiveness, Predominantly in Males

1Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Weesperplein 4, 1018 XA Amsterdam, Netherlands
2Research Institute Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 15776, 1001 NG Amsterdam, Netherlands
3Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 75867, 1070 AW Amsterdam, Netherlands
4Center for Psychological Trauma, Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam, Netherlands
5Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, Meijboomlaan 1, 2242 PR Wassenaar, Netherlands
6The Center for Social and Humanities Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80 202, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia

Received 15 January 2015; Accepted 27 May 2015

Academic Editor: Maureen F. Dollard

Copyright © 2015 Wieke de Vente et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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