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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 437328, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/437328
Research Article

Transcriptional and Biochemical Effects of Cadmium and Manganese on the Defense System of Octopus vulgaris Paralarvae

1Laboratory of Molecular Ecology and Biotechnology, National Research Council, Institute for Coastal Marine Environment, UOS Capo Granitola, Torretta Granitola, 91021 Trapani, Italy
2National Research Council, Institute for Coastal Marine Environment, Calata Porta di Massa, 80133 Naples, Italy

Received 2 September 2014; Revised 6 November 2014; Accepted 27 November 2014

Academic Editor: Francesco Dondero

Copyright © 2015 Aldo Nicosia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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