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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015, Article ID 481621, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/481621
Research Article

Serum Levels of ApoA1 and ApoA2 Are Associated with Cognitive Status in Older Men

1Department of Geriatrics, Huadong Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040, China
2Department of Aging, Antiaging and Cognitive Function, Shanghai Institute of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Shanghai 200040, China
3Research Center of Aging and Medicine, Department of Aging and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Clinical Geriatrics, Huadong Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040, China

Received 15 August 2015; Revised 4 November 2015; Accepted 8 November 2015

Academic Editor: Wiep Scheper

Copyright © 2015 Cheng Ma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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