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BioMed Research International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 485624, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/485624
Research Article

Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Identifies Novel Mutations in RP1 as a Relatively Common Cause of Autosomal Recessive Rod-Cone Dystrophy

1INSERM, U968, 75012 Paris, France
2Sorbonne Universités, UPMC University, Paris 06, UMR_S 968, Institut de la Vision, 75012 Paris, France
3CNRS, UMR_7210, 75012 Paris, France
4IntegraGen SA, Genopole Campus 1, Building G8, 91030 Evry, France
5Centre Hospitalier National d’Ophtalmologie des Quinze-Vingts, DHU ViewMaintain, INSERM-DHOS CIC 1423, 75012 Paris, France
6Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, 75019 Paris, France
7Académie des Sciences-Institut de France, 75006 Paris, France
8University College London Institute of Ophthalmology, 11-43 Bath Street, London EC1V 9EL, UK

Received 27 June 2014; Accepted 10 July 2014

Academic Editor: Calvin Yu-Chian Chen

Copyright © 2015 Said El Shamieh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

We report ophthalmic and genetic findings in families with autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy (arRCD) and RP1 mutations. Detailed ophthalmic examination was performed in 242 sporadic and arRCD subjects. Genomic DNA was investigated using our customized next generation sequencing panel targeting up to 123 genes implicated in inherited retinal disorders. Stringent filtering coupled with Sanger sequencing and followed by cosegregation analysis was performed to confirm biallelism and the implication of the most likely disease causing variants. Sequencing identified 9 RP1 mutations in 7 index cases. Eight of the mutations were novel, and all cosegregated with severe arRCD phenotype, found associated with additional macular changes. Among the identified mutations, 4 belong to a region, previously associated with arRCD, and 5 others in a region previously associated with adRCD. Our prevalence studies showed that RP1 mutations account for up to 2.5% of arRCD. These results point out for the necessity of sequencing RP1 when genetically investigating sporadic and arRCD. It further highlights the interest of unbiased sequencing technique, which allows investigating the implication of the same gene in different modes of inheritance. Finally, it reports that different regions of RP1 can also lead to arRCD.